Improving the Human Body

When you look at the modern automobile compared to those of a generation or two ago, it is not difficult to see the improvements: rear window defrosters, improved gas mileage, hands free cell phone technology, CD and Ipod sound systems GPS capabilities not to mention automatic transmission, power steering and brakes and power windows for you old folks like me. Engineers and auto manufactures are always trying to come up with new improvements for next year’s model. Some so-called improvements, don’t pan out as an improvement, because there end up being more negatives than positives. That is not considered an improvement. Remember the “hard-top convertible” with the metal roof that folded into the trunk? I don’t know what the problem was but they don’t make that model anymore. Perhaps because it left you with no trunk space.

A “new improved model” is always the desire of a manufacturer of any appliance (except for staplers and can openers which never seem to work any better). With this in mind, here’s a challenge for you: How would you improve the function of the human body? Keep in mind we are not talking about the appearance. I can think of a lot of improvements in the “looks” department for a lot of people, especially those who have a face like the grill of a Ford Edsel. However We all pretty much function alike, two kidneys, one heart, two lungs, and one liver. So how would you improve upon that? Remember improvement means a change with no negatives or at least more positive aspects than negative. How about if we designed the bones to be stronger so that they did not break? That would be great except that for bone tissue to be strong enough not to break, it would have to be so heavy that you would not be able to lift your legs.

How about getting rid of some parts like when the manufacturers replaced the old hand cranks with electric starters in automobiles? Some have suggested that perhaps we really do not need some organs like the appendix. In fact, for a while they were doing appendectomies for no reason. Now they realize that the appendix has an important function in the immune system and unless it is so diseased it is life threatening, you should keep it for your entire life.

How about adding some parts? You could theorize that if two kidneys are good, three kidneys would be better. But then, where are you going to put the third? We cannot put it in the trunk. The human body has no empty spaces and besides, 99.9% of the people in the world get along fine with only two. Some even do well enough with just one.

We have not been able to improve on parts of the body like you would the transmission or the defroster. We have man-made hearts, kidney machines, knee, hips, but anyone who has one will tell you they do not work as well as the “factory installed one did when new.” And there is the key. If you are convinced that the parts designed and built in the womb are the best and no man can build better, then you act accordingly. If you believe that the human organism and its parts are evolving and a little tinkering by someone with a post-graduate degree can make it better, then you act another way. If you believe that the Wisdom of the universe designed this body and placed within it the most talented builder (the innate intelligence of the body) to construct and maintain it, then you will want to make sure that there are no interferences to the innate intelligence doing its job creating it and recreating it every day. If you believe that man can improve upon its design or function, well then you will want those people to keep tinkering with it in the hope that they will finally do something they have not been able to do since the beginning of mankind, improve the human body. Once the world decides we cannot improve upon the human body but merely enable its inborn wisdom to be expressed without interference, human beings will begin to reach their full potential. That is the thinking and the practice of your family chiropractor.